August 13, 2022

Side effects, how to take and more

Find answers to some frequently asked questions about losartan oral tablets.

Is losartan an angiotensin receptor blocker, ACE inhibitor, beta-blocker, diuretic or blood thinner?

Losartan belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs).

Losartan does not belong to any of the following drug groups:

The groups of drugs listed above are used to treat high blood pressure and other heart problems. Each group works differently in the body.

If you have questions about how losartan or other ARBs compare to ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, blood thinners, or diuretics, talk to your doctor.

Has losartan been recalled?

Yes, losartan was first recalled in 2018.

A drug recall occurs when a drug is taken off the market and is no longer available. This usually happens due to a security issue. For example, the medicine may contain an unexpected ingredient that should not be there.

Losartan and other angiotensin II receptor blockers have been reminded because they accidentally contained an ingredient known to cause cancer.

Since 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been working with losartan manufacturers to ensure that losartan products do not contain this unwanted ingredient.

To find out if your losartan prescription has been affected by this drug recall, you can visit the FDA website for a listing of recalled products.

If you have any questions about the recall of losartan, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Does losartan interact with bananas, grapefruit or coffee?

There are no known interactions between losartan and bananas, grapefruit or coffee.

But losartan can cause high potassium in your blood. Bananas are rich in potassium. It is therefore possible that eating bananas while taking losartan may increase the risk of this side effect.

Additionally, drinking coffee can raise your blood pressure. And losartan is used to lower blood pressure. So if you drink coffee while taking losartan, the drug may not work as well for you.

If you have any questions about taking losartan with certain foods or drinks, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

How does losartan work? And what is its half-life?

Losartan belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin II receptor blockers. It works by blocking a hormone in your body called angiotensin. The way a drug works is called its mechanism of action.

Angiotensin causes many effects in your body, including:

  • constriction (tightening) of your blood vessels, which raises your blood pressure
  • increasing the amount of salt and water in your body, which increases your blood pressure
  • reduce the amount of blood flow to your kidneys, which causes kidney problems

By blocking angiotensin, losartan relaxes your blood vessels and increases blood flow to your kidneys. This lowers your blood pressure and helps your kidneys work properly.

The half-life of losartan is approximately 2 hours. The half-life of a drug is the time it takes for half the dose of the drug to leave your body. In other words, it takes about 2 hours for half of a dose of losartan to leave your body.

How does losartan compare to lisinopril, telmisartan and irbesartan?

Losartan, telmisartan (Micardis) and irbesartan (Avapro) belong to a group of medications called angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs). Lisinopril (Zestril) belongs to a different group of drugs called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

ARBs and ACE inhibitors are used to treat high blood pressure and other heart problems. ARBs and ACE inhibitors work by blocking a hormone in your body called angiotensin. Medicines block this hormone in different ways.

To learn more about how losartan compares to telmisartan, irbesartan, and lisinopril, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. They can recommend the medication that is right for you.

Does losartan cause a cough?

Yes, losartan can cause a cough.

Losartan belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs). A different group of drugs called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors usually cause coughing.

In fact, an ARB, such as losartan, is sometimes prescribed as an alternative for people who cough with an ACE inhibitor.

If you coughed while taking an ACE inhibitor, you may still have a cough while taking an ARB.

If you are concerned about your risk of coughing while using losartan, talk to your doctor.


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